Sunday, May 17, 2009

"Bor" Polish Poland Made SUPERGUN bolt-action 7.62x51 sniper rifle and "Tor" 12.7 anti-materiel rifle

"Bor" Polish Poland Made SUPERGUN bolt-action 7.62x51 sniper rifle and "Tor" 12.7 anti-materiel rifle

The Bor is a new Polish bolt-action 7.62x51mm NATO caliber sniper rifle. The weapon received the code name Alex during development, after the name of the lead designer Aleksander Leżucha, creator of the 12.7 mm Tor anti-materiel rifle. After the development phase, the rifle received the military designation 'Bor'.
After 1999, when Poland became a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, there was a need for new firearms for the Polish Armed Forces compatible with NATO standards. Starting in the early 2000s, at the Mechanical Equipment Research and Developing Centre (Ośrodek Badawczo Rozwojowy Sprzętu Mechanicznego - OBR SM) in Tarnów, engineer Aleksander Leżucha started his work on a new standard sniper rifle. The work on the Alex had financial backing of the Polish Science Research and Information Technology Ministry in a joint venture construction with the manufacturer OBR SM Tarnów. It is intended that this sniper rifle will ultimately replace all precision rifles of this caliber in Polish service (currently (2009) mostly SWD).

In the summer of 2005, testing of the new rifle began. The Bor was first unveiled at the 12th International Defense Industry Exhibition MSPO in September 2005 in Kielce. The weapon then went into production in 2006, when a short series was made.

In the spring of 2007 the 7.62 mm Bor had passed all the tests required to be introduced into Polish inventories. The Polish Armed Forces wanted to acquire 36 systems in 2007.[1]

[edit] Design details
The Bor is a bullpup-configuration bolt-action magazine-fed sniper rifle. The overall construction provides optimum accuracy through the use of a fluted (minimum weight/strength) free-floating barrel, which allows a full barrel length of 680 mm (26.8 in) in a short overall length of 1,038 mm (40.9 in). The muzzle is fitted with a double-baffle muzzle brake, which is claimed to reduce recoil by up to 30%. The "in-line" design of the barrel-receiver group also directs recoil rearwards in a straight line, minimizing muzzle flip. A sturdy adjustable bipod is fitted to the front of the fore-end. The rifle features a fully adjustable buttstock and cheek riser. A folding/adjustable monopod located behind the magazine on the inside of the buttstock can be used to support the rifle in firing position during extended periods of deployment. No iron or emergency sights are provided; a MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny rail is mounted above the centerline of the barrel, over the receiver area for mounting various optical sights. The standard telescopic sight is a Leupold 4.5-14x50, with sight grid mil-dot reticle, parallax correction and an adjustment range of 100 MOA.

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